Zoology

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  • Weighing and measuring animals at the London Zoo

    Zoology News
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:31 am
    A red-ruffed Lemur named Cid is weighed on Aug. 21 at the London Zoo in England.
  • From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Aug 2014 | 11:14 am
    A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches -- including Hawaiian coral reefs and the extreme environments of arctic soils and deep sea vents. The study considers the diversity, ecology, and distribution of the fungi of the genus Malassezia in light of new insights gained from screening environmental sequencing datasets from around the world.
  • Photos: Annual weigh-in at ZSL London Zoo

    Zoology News
    22 Aug 2014 | 10:23 am
    The annual weight-in ZSL London Zoo on August 21, 2014 in London, England. The height and mass of every animal in the zoo, of which there are over 16,000, is recorded and submitted to the Zoological Information Management System.
  • The cerato-mandibular ligament: a key functional trait for grazing in damselfishes (Pomacentridae)

    MedWorm: Zoology
    21 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Conclusion: This study shows that the c-md ligament is a key trait both for sound production and for grazing activities in damselfishes. The buccal jaw slam enables the fish to perform accurate strikes on small filamentous algae. This kind of bite probably plays a major role in farming activity and allows grazing damselfishes to occupy distinct niches, possibly increasing their competitive evolutionary success. (Source: Frontiers in Zoology)MedWorm Sponsor Message: Find the best Christmas Sales, Boxing Day Sales and January Sales here.
  • 10-Foot Bobbit Worm is Like a Creature From Your Nightmares

    WebEcoist
    Steph
    22 Aug 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Appearing with no warning whatsoever and slicing its prey in half with its scissor-like jaws, this bizarre predatory aquatic creature is known colloquially as the Bobbit worm (Eunice aphroditois). Rainbow-hued and segmented, the organism buries itself in the gravel, mud and coral at the bottom of the sea and waits until one of its five […] The post 10-Foot Bobbit Worm is Like a Creature From Your Nightmares appeared first on WebEcoist.
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    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily

  • From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus

    21 Aug 2014 | 11:14 am
    A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches -- including Hawaiian coral reefs and the extreme environments of arctic soils and deep sea vents. The study considers the diversity, ecology, and distribution of the fungi of the genus Malassezia in light of new insights gained from screening environmental sequencing datasets from around the world.
  • How hummingbirds evolved to detect sweetness

    21 Aug 2014 | 11:14 am
    Hummingbirds' ability to detect sweetness evolved from an ancestral savory taste receptor that is mostly tuned to flavors in amino acids. Feasting on nectar and the occasional insect, the tiny birds expanded throughout North and South America, numbering more than 300 species over the 40 to 72 million years since they branched off from their closest relative, the swift.
  • The marmoset animal model recapitulates disease symptoms of MERS infection in humans

    21 Aug 2014 | 11:14 am
    A new article reports the first animal model that recapitulates the severe and sometimes lethal respiratory symptoms seen in human patients and suggests that the common marmoset will play an important role in the development effective countermeasures against Middle East respiratory syndrome corona virus.
  • Fish and coral smell a bad neighborhood: Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover

    21 Aug 2014 | 11:13 am
    Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs. Damaged coral reefs emit chemical cues that repulse young coral and fish, discouraging them from settling in the degraded habitat, according to new research. The study shows for the first time that coral larvae can smell the difference between healthy and damaged reefs when they decide where to settle.
  • Songbirds: Juveniles delay departure, make frequent stopovers during first migration

    20 Aug 2014 | 1:47 pm
    Juvenile songbirds on spring migration travel from overwintering sites in the tropics to breeding destinations thousands of kilometres away with no prior experience to guide them. Now, a new study has tracked these 'student pilots' on their first long-haul flight and found significant differences between the timing of juvenile migration and that of experienced adults.
 
 
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    WebEcoist

  • 10-Foot Bobbit Worm is Like a Creature From Your Nightmares

    Steph
    22 Aug 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Appearing with no warning whatsoever and slicing its prey in half with its scissor-like jaws, this bizarre predatory aquatic creature is known colloquially as the Bobbit worm (Eunice aphroditois). Rainbow-hued and segmented, the organism buries itself in the gravel, mud and coral at the bottom of the sea and waits until one of its five […] The post 10-Foot Bobbit Worm is Like a Creature From Your Nightmares appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • No Vital Signs: 7 Abandoned Health Food Stores

    Steve
    19 Aug 2014 | 10:36 am
    Health food stores may serve a niche market but their customer base is unusually loyal. That said, health food stores (like their patrons) aren't immortal. The post No Vital Signs: 7 Abandoned Health Food Stores appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Bike Campers! 8 Ultra-Mobile Pedal-Powered Shelters

    Steph
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:31 pm
    You don’t need a gas-guzzling truck to haul around a camper, tent or emergency shelter – you can use the power of your leg muscles with these 8 clever creations made to be pulled by bicycles. These ultra-mobile bike campers range from ultra-lightweight and simple designs made of fabric to floating creations comprised of recycled […] The post Bike Campers! 8 Ultra-Mobile Pedal-Powered Shelters appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Robot Flash Mob Mimics Swarms and Cells in Nature

    Steph
    15 Aug 2014 | 11:23 am
    The world’s first self-assembling robot flash mob took place at Harvard University, with 1,024 tiny robots coming together into a starfish shape in a process mimicking the natural behavior of swarms. bed Kilobots, the robots are just a few centimeters wide and have three pin-like legs enabling them to move across a surface. The researchers […] The post Robot Flash Mob Mimics Swarms and Cells in Nature appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Chapel Oak: France’s Oldest Tree Serves as a Worship Space

    Steph
    13 Aug 2014 | 2:21 pm
    A handmade wooden staircase spirals around the trunk of the oldest tree in france, an oak known as the Chêne Chapelle or ‘Chapel Oak.’ Located in the small farming village of Allouville-Bellefosse, the tree has lived through some of the nation’s most notable historic events, from the reign of Louis XIV to Napoleon, and now it’s a […] The post Chapel Oak: France’s Oldest Tree Serves as a Worship Space appeared first on WebEcoist.
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    ReptileApartment.com

  • PIJAC | Pet Proponent to Anti-Pet Ownership?

    James Tintle
    23 Aug 2014 | 7:12 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Ed Sayres Ed Sayres former CEO of the ASPCA has now been ‘OFFERED’ the position of CEO and President positions at PIJAC. What does this mean to pet owners everywhere and more specific the exotic pet keeper. In our personal opinion not a whole lot. It’s like any other political move. The tangible changes occurring when we vote one out for another lesser evil are fairly null and void. Does he have a track record of being what some would say…
  • Maternal Incubation | Nature Versus Nurture in Snakes

    John F Taylor
    22 Aug 2014 | 9:19 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." “Female Python sebae brooding eggs Tropicario, FIN” by Tigerpython – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons. A discussion arose in a group I became a part of this week concerning maternal incubation versus using an incubator. It’s accepted as it were, this practice with colubrid snakes won’t work. While some colubrid snakes may stay with the eggs for a few days, they’re not known to attempt maternal…
  • Turtles ‘Talk’ to Each Other, Parents Call Out to Offspring

    John F Taylor
    21 Aug 2014 | 4:09 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Courtesy of Newsweek This is an incredible story where researchers discover that South American River Turtles are communicating with one another! We’re working on few points to bring to the newsletter this week where we discuss reptile cognition and culture. Make sure to subscribe now if you haven’t already to the Sunday Squamata Post Here’s the link to the original story read it over;  Turtles ‘Talk’ to Each Other, Parents…
 
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