Zoology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Endangered hammerhead shark found migrating into unprotected waters

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:58 pm
    The precise movements of a young hammerhead shark have been tracked for the first time, scientists report. The study, which ran over a 10-month period, reveals important gaps in current efforts to protect these endangered sharks and suggests key locations that should be protected to help the survival of the species.
  • Sue Carter Named Director of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University

    Zoology News
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:34 pm
    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Indiana University has appointed Sue Carter, a pioneering leader in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, as director of The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, effective Nov. 1. The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington was founded in 1947 by its namesake, zoologist Alfred Kinsey.
  • Is Female Visual Signaling to Male Song Socially Regulated in Brown‐headed Cowbirds?

    MedWorm: Zoology
    25 Nov 2014 | 7:25 am
    Abstract This research focused on how adult female brown‐headed cowbirds, Molothrus ater, regulate social feedback on a group level to shape the development of male song. Specifically, females produce rapid wing movements in response to male song, termed ‘wing strokes,’ which have been shown to shape male song and predict song quality. These effects have been documented in captive dyads and triads, but not in more naturalistic flocks, where song development actually occurs. Here, we studied wing stroking in small seminatural flocks of differing female‐to‐male ratios. Despite…
  • Floating Farm: River-Based Greenhouse is a Model of Self-Sufficiency

    WebEcoist
    Steph
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:00 pm
    A single jellyfish-inspired floating modular greenhouse can provide enough food for two families, or join together with additional modular platforms to create a ‘stronger organism.’ Italian architecture firm StudioMobile created Jellyfish Barge as a floating farm that requires no land, fresh water or energy from conventional sources. Plus, it’s made using low-cost and recycled materials. “The […] The post Floating Farm: River-Based Greenhouse is a Model of Self-Sufficiency appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Ball Pythons | Enigma of the Pet Trade

    ReptileApartment.com
    John F Taylor
    25 Nov 2014 | 1:00 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by Todd Cornwell Unique Birthday Party Parties for Kids & Reptile Rescue  Ball Pythons (Python regius) make great first pets, they are docile, slow, cool looking, and don’t require a huge space or enclosure. They can also be picky eaters, prone to getting colds (Upper Respiratory Infections or URI), and scale rot. A lot people looking for a first reptile pet, choose the Ball python (P. regius). There are hundreds of “care…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Endangered hammerhead shark found migrating into unprotected waters

    25 Nov 2014 | 5:58 pm
    The precise movements of a young hammerhead shark have been tracked for the first time, scientists report. The study, which ran over a 10-month period, reveals important gaps in current efforts to protect these endangered sharks and suggests key locations that should be protected to help the survival of the species.
  • Endangered species success: Idaho salmon regaining fitness advantage

    25 Nov 2014 | 11:08 am
    Once on the brink of extinction with only a few fish remaining, Snake River sockeye salmon are regaining the fitness they need to rebuild wild populations. A new analysis shows that naturally spawned offspring of fish saved by a hatchery program are now surviving to return at increasing rate -- high enough to not only sustain the population but also to rebuild it.
  • 'Scary' centipede's genes reveal how life evolved on our planet

    25 Nov 2014 | 11:08 am
    Centipedes, those many-legged creatures that startle us in our homes and gardens, have been genetically sequenced for the first time. An international team of over 100 scientists today reveals how this humble arthropod’s DNA gave them new insight into how life developed on our planet. 
  • Mining can damage fish habitats far downstream, study shows

    25 Nov 2014 | 8:18 am
    Anglers across the nation wondering why luck at their favorite fishing spot seems to have dried up may have a surprising culprit: a mine miles away, even in a different state. Scientists have taken a first broad look at the impacts of mines across the country and found that mining can damage fish habitats miles downstream, and even in streams not directly connected to the mines.
  • Vultures evolved an extreme gut to cope with disgusting dietary habits

    25 Nov 2014 | 8:18 am
    How is it that vultures can live on a diet of carrion that would at least lead to severe food-poisoning, and more likely kill most other animals?
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Zoology News

  • Sue Carter Named Director of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:34 pm
    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Indiana University has appointed Sue Carter, a pioneering leader in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, as director of The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, effective Nov. 1. The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington was founded in 1947 by its namesake, zoologist Alfred Kinsey.
  • Trinity Zoologists Champion a Clever Conservation Solution: 'Vulture Restaurants'

    22 Oct 2014 | 11:44 am
    Zoologists from the School of Natural Sciences at Trinity College Dublin are proposing an ingenious idea to help conserve populations of African white-backed vultures. The iconic birds, which play a critical role in sustaining healthy ecosystems, may need to dine for free in human-staffed 'vulture restaurants' if they are to survive spells of food scarcity in Swaziland and neighbouring countries.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    MedWorm: Zoology

  • Is Female Visual Signaling to Male Song Socially Regulated in Brown‐headed Cowbirds?

    25 Nov 2014 | 7:25 am
    Abstract This research focused on how adult female brown‐headed cowbirds, Molothrus ater, regulate social feedback on a group level to shape the development of male song. Specifically, females produce rapid wing movements in response to male song, termed ‘wing strokes,’ which have been shown to shape male song and predict song quality. These effects have been documented in captive dyads and triads, but not in more naturalistic flocks, where song development actually occurs. Here, we studied wing stroking in small seminatural flocks of differing female‐to‐male ratios. Despite…
  • Menopause and reproductive senescence in comparative context.

    24 Nov 2014 | 3:55 pm
    Authors: Erwin JM, Hof PR Abstract Menopause and reproductive senescence can be more fully understood by examining these phenomena where they occur in nonhuman mammals, as well as humans, and especially by comparisons among primates. In addition to concerns about human health and welfare, successful programs for wildlife management and agriculture, and the propagation and conservation of endangered species depend on detailed understanding of reproduction and fertility throughout the life span. Appropriate care of elderly primates in zoological gardens also requires knowledge of their health,…
  • Lumpy skin disease: Attempted propagation in tick cell lines and presence of viral DNA in field ticks collected from naturally-infected cattle

    24 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 25 November 2014 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): E.S.M. Tuppurainen , E.H. Venter , J.A.W. Coetzer , L. Bell-Sakyi Lumpy skin disease (LSD) is of substantial economic importance for the cattle industry in Africa and the Near and Middle East. Several insect species are thought to transmit the disease mechanically. Recent transmission studies have demonstrated the first evidence for a role of hard (ixodid) ticks as vectors of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV). The aim of this study was to attempt in vitro growth of the virus in Rhipicephalus spp.
  • Are you Paying Attention? Female Wolf Spiders Increase Dragline Silk Advertisements When Males do not Court

    24 Nov 2014 | 8:26 am
    Abstract Females of many spider species invest in chemical advertisements to attract males, yet variation in investment relative to the presence or quality of males remains poorly understood. Males of the wolf spider Pardosa milvina court females longer and more intensively when in contact with female silk and also court more intensively when encountering silk from virgin rather than mated females; therefore, females may use silk as a medium to advertise their receptivity to mate. We estimated female investment in advertisements by measuring variation in the quantity and type of silk…
  • Basking Activity is Modulated by Health State but is Constrained by Conspicuousness to Predators in Male Spanish Terrapins

    23 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Abstract Aerial basking may have several benefits for freshwater turtles in addition to thermoregulation such as removing parasites from the skin, which would improve health state. However, basking outside of water may be risky because it may expose freshwater turtles to terrestrial predators. Here, we monitored the basking activity of male Spanish terrapins (Mauremys leprosa) in a wild population of the south‐western of the Iberian Peninsula. We also measured body size, health state parameters, parasite prevalence, and limb coloration of these individuals. We aimed to examine whether…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WebEcoist

  • Floating Farm: River-Based Greenhouse is a Model of Self-Sufficiency

    Steph
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:00 pm
    A single jellyfish-inspired floating modular greenhouse can provide enough food for two families, or join together with additional modular platforms to create a ‘stronger organism.’ Italian architecture firm StudioMobile created Jellyfish Barge as a floating farm that requires no land, fresh water or energy from conventional sources. Plus, it’s made using low-cost and recycled materials. “The […] The post Floating Farm: River-Based Greenhouse is a Model of Self-Sufficiency appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • IKEA Doll Beds Are Going To The Dogs & Cats

    Steve
    25 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    Pet owners have discovered IKEA's DUKTIG wooden doll bed & linens sets make adorable dog & cat beds, turning a niche product into a viral hit in the process! The post IKEA Doll Beds Are Going To The Dogs & Cats appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Jet Set: Reclaimed Aircraft Renovated into 2-Bedroom Apartment

    Steph
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Sleeping on an airplane isn’t typically an attractive prospect, conjuring visions of crammed limbs and the potential for a stranger to end up drooling on your shoulder. But one bright blue jet in Amsterdam offers far more comfortable accommodations – in the form of a two-bedroom apartment that you can rent on AirBNB. KLM renovated […] The post Jet Set: Reclaimed Aircraft Renovated into 2-Bedroom Apartment appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Electronics Plant Ditches Disks, Pitches Lettuce

    Steve
    18 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    Be-leaf it or not, a mothballed Japanese electronics plant reinvented itself as a hydroponic vegetable farm while putting a healthy spin on greenwashing. The post Electronics Plant Ditches Disks, Pitches Lettuce appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Trashy Hotel: 22 Temporary Rooms Made of Junk

    Steph
    14 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    If someone told you a hotel is trashy, that would most likely turn you off with visions of unsanitary conditions and scratchy bedsheets. But in this case, ‘trashy’ is a literal descriptor, indicating that the 22 rooms spread across the city of Mannheim are actually made of garbage – and that’s a surprisingly good thing, […] The post Trashy Hotel: 22 Temporary Rooms Made of Junk appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ReptileApartment.com

  • Ball Pythons | Enigma of the Pet Trade

    John F Taylor
    25 Nov 2014 | 1:00 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by Todd Cornwell Unique Birthday Party Parties for Kids & Reptile Rescue  Ball Pythons (Python regius) make great first pets, they are docile, slow, cool looking, and don’t require a huge space or enclosure. They can also be picky eaters, prone to getting colds (Upper Respiratory Infections or URI), and scale rot. A lot people looking for a first reptile pet, choose the Ball python (P. regius). There are hundreds of “care…
  • Exotic pet owners given 30 days to free animals – Yahoo Maktoob News

    John F Taylor
    25 Nov 2014 | 11:13 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Exotic pet owners given 30 days to free animals – Yahoo Maktoob News. This news which just arrived in my newsfeed today may have serious implications for one of our favourite species of Agamid lizards and also the subject of my most recent book The Guide to Uromastyx being published by ColdBlooded Publishing. We will keep updating as more information becomes available. The article Exotic pet owners given 30 days to free animals – Yahoo…
  • US lizards set to get city treats – Bangalore Mirror

    John F Taylor
    25 Nov 2014 | 9:15 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Courtesy of Silkworm in the Classroom US lizards set to get city treats – Bangalore Mirror. An Associate Professor from the University of Agricultural Sciences by the name of Dr. BL Chidananda was interviewed regarding the recent approval by the United States Department of Agriculture to import silkworm eggs from India. Mulberry Farms an insect breeder in Louisiana is where the breeding operation is due to take place. Does this mean the…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ZOOmoments - The Zoo Within

  • Pere David’s Deer Free Again in China

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:15 am
    Modern zoos are often seen as present-day Noah’s Arks, due to the fact that their resources are mainly dedicated to saving endangered species from extinction. Several classic examples are known from the past where species owe their existence to zoos and wildlife parks. One of the most famous of such animals is the Pere David’s deer (Elaphurus davidianus), also known as milu. The species has been extinct for more than a hundred years in its original habitat, but thanks to captive breeding, Pere David’s deer can now be found in China again. Read More...
  • Herpestids in European Zoological Gardens

    13 Nov 2014 | 11:05 am
    Taxonomic Overview Currently there are 34 species of mongooses described in the family Herpestidae, although further taxonomic research may change this number in the future. Twenty-five members of the taxon live in Africa and nine in Asia. According to the current subdivision of Herpestidae ― using not only morphology, but also behavioural ecology and molecular markers ― two subfamilies are supported within the taxon. The subfamily Herpestinae involves 23, mostly large and solitary mongoose species (genus Atilax, Bdeogale, Cynictis, Galerella, Herpestes, Ichneumia, Paracynictis,…
  • Which is the Best Zoo of the World?

    6 Nov 2014 | 7:46 am
    For many, merely hearing this question makes their hair stand on end, however, finding the answer means a lot for many others who even enjoy the process! Is it possible at all to find a comprehensive and objective answer to the question in the title? This is one of the most controversial topics nowadays that often leads to it being shunned discreetly. The avoiding of the topic is not unintentional. Is it important at all to find the answer? It surely is, for the winners! So, let us devote some of our time to examine the matter! Read More...
  • A Real Success Story – How the Hungarian Meadow Viper has been Saved from Extinction

    1 Nov 2014 | 7:25 am
    While some conservationists oppose or at least debate the raison d'être of ex situ conservation, there are positive examples which show the effectiveness of cooperation with in situ methods. The great success of the Hungarian Meadow Viper LIFE-project is a good example for this. In addition, this conservation project works well with zoos, which makes it a good example of this kind of cooperation. When the project started in 2004, there were only about 500 Hungarian meadow vipers (Vipera ursinii rakosiensis) in the wild, and the species was considered almost extinct. Their number - including…
Log in