Zoology

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  • Short-necked Triassic marine reptile discovered in China

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily
    17 Dec 2014 | 12:40 pm
    A new species of short-necked marine reptile from the Triassic period has been discovered in China.
  • Social Context Modulates Predator Evasion Strategy In Guppies

    MedWorm: Zoology
    18 Dec 2014 | 6:36 am
    Abstract Social context is a powerful mediator of behavioral decisions across animal taxa, as the presence of conspecifics comes with both costs and benefits. In risky situations, the safety conferred by the presence of conspecifics can outweigh the costs of competition for resources. How the costs and benefits of grouping influence decisions among alternative antipredator behaviors remains largely unexplored. We took advantage of the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) to examine the influence of social context on alternative behavioral responses to threats. We compared the frequency of…
  • Climb Like a Gecko: Biomimicry Enables Extremely Sticky Adhesive

    WebEcoist
    Steph
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:00 am
    The biomechanics of a gecko’s toes have made it possible for researchers to create an incredibly sticky adhesive that’s strong enough to allow a human to climb up a glass wall. A team at Mark Cutkosky’s Biomimetics and Dextrous Manipulation Lab created a device that spreads large loads evenly across every patch of the synthetic […] The post Climb Like a Gecko: Biomimicry Enables Extremely Sticky Adhesive appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Giant Glass Lizards (Scheltopusik)

    ReptileApartment.com
    John F Taylor
    14 Dec 2014 | 11:25 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Courtesy of Whitney Hutchinson European Giant Glass Lizard *denotes affiliate link European Glass Lizards (Pseudopus apodus) are sometimes known as Scheltopusik which when translated from the original Slavik word means ‘Yellow Belly’. They can also be called ‘Legless lizard’ in some circles. Scheltopusik is the more often used name or simply Glass Lizard. While often seen for sale it would seem their captive breeding is still one of those…
  • An Overview of the History of Captive Giraffes

    ZOOmoments - The Zoo Within
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:44 am
    Overview of giraffe subspecies in the wild Giraffes are among the most popular animals kept in zoos. However, while a giraffe is ’only’ a giraffe for most of the visitors, it is also an important genetic resource for the survival of the species in the eyes of the staff of zoos and other conservation organisations, who are working to preserve genetically pure giraffe subspecies. The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) inhabits a lot of savannah areas in Sub-Saharan Africa, but these areas are fragmented and isolated from each other. Nine subspecies are living in these separated areas. Due to…
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    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Short-necked Triassic marine reptile discovered in China

    17 Dec 2014 | 12:40 pm
    A new species of short-necked marine reptile from the Triassic period has been discovered in China.
  • National model of restoration: Nine Mile Run

    17 Dec 2014 | 10:14 am
    A study by a hydrologist shows that one of the largest urban-stream restorations in the United States has led to the recovery of fish and, more importantly, a groundswell of local support. Nine Mile Run, which is part of a watershed that drains 6.5 square miles of land, had been truly abused by urbanization and industrialization. Toxins leached into the creek from a slag heap left over from the steelmaking process, sewer lines discharged into the water, and so much of the waterway had been buried in culverts or diverted from its natural path that Nine Mile Run had become toxic. The…
  • Contrasting views of kin selection assessed

    17 Dec 2014 | 10:14 am
    Researchers have used several different ways of testing Hamilton's rule, the core mathematical formula of kin selection, as an explanation for the evolution of much altruistic behavior in animals. These vary in their realism and their ability to generate predictions. The variety of approaches, as well as different views about what constitutes an explanation, helps explain a divisive debate about the importance of kin selection in evolution. A new criterion of 'causal aptness' could help resolve disputes.
  • Asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs may have nearly knocked off mammals, too

    17 Dec 2014 | 7:13 am
    The classic story is that mammals rose to dominance after the dinosaurs went extinct, but a new study shows that some of the most common mammals living alongside dinosaurs, the metatherians, extinct relatives of living marsupials, were also nearly wiped out when an asteroid hit the planet 66 million years ago.
  • Research shows Jaws didn't kill his cousin

    16 Dec 2014 | 6:18 pm
    Our jawed ancestors weren't responsible for the demise of their jawless cousins as had been assumed. Instead, researchers believe that rising sea levels are more likely to blame. "When our jawed vertebrate ancestors overtook their jawless relatives 400 million years ago, it seems that it might not have been through direct competition but instead the inability of our jawless cousins to adapt to changing environmental conditions," an experts said.
 
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    MedWorm: Zoology

  • Social Context Modulates Predator Evasion Strategy In Guppies

    18 Dec 2014 | 6:36 am
    Abstract Social context is a powerful mediator of behavioral decisions across animal taxa, as the presence of conspecifics comes with both costs and benefits. In risky situations, the safety conferred by the presence of conspecifics can outweigh the costs of competition for resources. How the costs and benefits of grouping influence decisions among alternative antipredator behaviors remains largely unexplored. We took advantage of the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) to examine the influence of social context on alternative behavioral responses to threats. We compared the frequency of…
  • Effects of epigallocatechin gallate on lipid metabolism and its underlying molecular mechanism in broiler chickens

    17 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on fat metabolism and to establish the molecular mechanism of these effects in broilers. Seventy‐two 28‐day‐old male Ross 308 broiler chickens were divided into three groups with different levels of EGCG supplementation for 4 weeks: normal control (NC) group, L‐EGCG (a low‐level supplement of EGCG, 40 mg/kg body weight daily) and H‐EGCG (a high‐level supplement of EGCG, 80 mg/kg body weight daily). After 4 weeks of oral administration, EGCG significantly reduced the level of…
  • Editorial

    17 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    (Source: Journal of Fish Diseases)
  • Perinatal maternal feeding with an energy dense diet and/or micronutrient mixture drives offspring fat distribution depending on the sex and growth stage

    17 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    In conclusion, maternal HFS feeding during pregnancy and lactation was associated with a low offspring weight at birth and obese phenotypical features during adult life in a sex‐ and time‐dependent manner. Furthermore, maternal methyl donor supplementation protected against body weight gain in male offspring during lactation and in female offspring also during juvenile period. (Source: Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition)
  • Perturbing the developing skull: using laser ablation to investigate the robustness of the infraorbital bones in zebrafish ( Danio rerio )

    16 Dec 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Conclusions: These results highlight the developmental robustness of the IO bones and provide direct evidence that canal neuromasts play a role in canal wall development in the head. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the IO bones may be two distinct developmental modules. The mechanisms underlying developmental robustness are rarely investigated and are important to increase our understanding of evolutionary developmental biology of the vertebrate skull. (Source: BMC Developmental Biology)
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    WebEcoist

  • Climb Like a Gecko: Biomimicry Enables Extremely Sticky Adhesive

    Steph
    17 Dec 2014 | 10:00 am
    The biomechanics of a gecko’s toes have made it possible for researchers to create an incredibly sticky adhesive that’s strong enough to allow a human to climb up a glass wall. A team at Mark Cutkosky’s Biomimetics and Dextrous Manipulation Lab created a device that spreads large loads evenly across every patch of the synthetic […] The post Climb Like a Gecko: Biomimicry Enables Extremely Sticky Adhesive appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Mystery of the Turquoise Cat: What Caused This Color Change?

    Steph
    16 Dec 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Passersby were more than a little taken aback by the sight of a bright turquoise cat, so thoroughly dyed in such a strikingly unnatural shade that it seemed like someone intentionally transformed its fur. In fact, concerned about animal cruelty, residents of the city of Varna in Bulgaria even set up a Facebook group to […] The post Mystery of the Turquoise Cat: What Caused This Color Change? appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Ukivok: Alaska’s Abandoned Cliff-Hanging Village

    Steve
    9 Dec 2014 | 10:00 am
    The eerie cliff-hanging village of Uvitok still clings to the forbidding shore of Alaska's King Island, long after its last residents abandoned it for good. The post Ukivok: Alaska’s Abandoned Cliff-Hanging Village appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Bioluminescent Bugs: Predatory Glow Worms Discovered in Rainforest

    Steph
    3 Dec 2014 | 10:22 am
    Strange little green lights in the jungle piqued the curiosity of nature photographer Jeff Cremer when he spotted them while working at a lodge in Peru. Moving in for a closer look, Cremer found that the glowstick-like illumination was actually created by several dozen half-inch worms, thought to be the larvae of an unknown species […] The post Bioluminescent Bugs: Predatory Glow Worms Discovered in Rainforest appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Canceled Gas Pipeline Thrills Environmentalists

    Steve
    2 Dec 2014 | 10:00 am
    The cancelled South Stream natural gas pipeline project was to bring Russian gas through Bulgaria to the EU via a route designed to avoid the Ukraine. The post Canceled Gas Pipeline Thrills Environmentalists appeared first on WebEcoist.
 
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    ReptileApartment.com

  • Giant Glass Lizards (Scheltopusik)

    John F Taylor
    14 Dec 2014 | 11:25 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Courtesy of Whitney Hutchinson European Giant Glass Lizard *denotes affiliate link European Glass Lizards (Pseudopus apodus) are sometimes known as Scheltopusik which when translated from the original Slavik word means ‘Yellow Belly’. They can also be called ‘Legless lizard’ in some circles. Scheltopusik is the more often used name or simply Glass Lizard. While often seen for sale it would seem their captive breeding is still one of those…
  • Snake Mites | Scourge of the Reptile Keeper

    John F Taylor
    10 Dec 2014 | 3:00 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by Todd Cornwell Unique Birthday Party Parties for Kids & Reptile Rescue  Reptile Mites and How to Treat them Reptile mites, every snake owner hates them. And I don’t care how long you have owned snakes, whether you have 1, or 500. Reptile mites are carried in by rodents, in substrate, decorations, and even you the keeper. The eggs are so small you would never see them. They breed furiously, and from having none on Monday, on…
  • Explaining Ectothermy | Thermophysiology of Herps   Recently updated !

    John F Taylor
    8 Dec 2014 | 8:57 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by: Christina Miller CAHT/RVT, RLAT, BSc Herps Aren’t Cold-Blooded What is the most defining feature of our pet reptiles and amphibians? Many would argue that what unites reptiles and amphibians in the artificial grouping of “herps” is their cold-blooded nature, but this is not exactly accurate. “Cold-blooded” is an archaic term and its use implies that you do not understand their physiology. In fact, there are many species…
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    ZOOmoments - The Zoo Within

  • An Overview of the History of Captive Giraffes

    17 Dec 2014 | 10:44 am
    Overview of giraffe subspecies in the wild Giraffes are among the most popular animals kept in zoos. However, while a giraffe is ’only’ a giraffe for most of the visitors, it is also an important genetic resource for the survival of the species in the eyes of the staff of zoos and other conservation organisations, who are working to preserve genetically pure giraffe subspecies. The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) inhabits a lot of savannah areas in Sub-Saharan Africa, but these areas are fragmented and isolated from each other. Nine subspecies are living in these separated areas. Due to…
  • America vs. Europe?

    10 Dec 2014 | 7:18 am
    A few years ago I set to the seemingly impossible task of arranging the import of vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) to Europe. Luckily I found a good partner in the United States and I could solve the most difficult veterinary problems, too. I got a recommendation in the meantime to send our bat-eared foxes (Otocyon megalotis) to the same zoo (Brookfield), since this species was quite rare on the other side of the ocean. I was somewhat surprised in the end because I expected that the mutual transport would be much more problematic and expensive – it wasn’t. But why should we think about…
  • Nomen est omen I.

    3 Dec 2014 | 10:09 am
    Do our names say anything about us? When I introduce myself and you hear my name, do you get some information about me (e.g. about my job, etc...)? I don’t think so. But what about names in the animal kingdom? Biologists use the binomial nomenclature since Carl von Linné wrote his amazing work, Species Plantarum, in 1753. This format makes the identification of species easier during our daily work. Some Latin names are not very interesting while some say something about their owners (Ciconia nigra or Macropus giganteus). However, I found some names that show two important things: scientist…
  • Black Rhino Baby-Boom in Berlin Zoo

    26 Nov 2014 | 11:40 am
    According to fresh news, the outlook for black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis) has improved – unfortunately only in zoos. Although Berlin Zoological Garden (Germany) has a tradition of breeding this species and it has one of the largest breeding groups in the world, the almost concurrent birth of two calves in one zoo was still a big surprise. Can we hope for this to help achieve the goal of the European breeding programme (EEP) of this species? Let’s have a look at the background of breeding these animals in zoos. Read More...
 
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