Zoology

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  • Risk of interbreeding due to climate change lower than expected

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:41 am
    A surprising study of North and South American mammals, birds and amphibians finds that only about 6 percent of closely related species whose ranges do not currently overlap are likely to come into contact by the end of this century.
  • Redder? But too subtle for men, ladies

    Zoology News
    30 Jun 2015 | 4:24 pm
    New Delhi, June 30: Women's faces acquire extra redness during ovulation, but it's not this subtle change in complexion but their behaviour, clothes or other factors that men seem to find attractive, a study exploring the biology of facial attractiveness has suggested. The study by a team of scientists in the UK is the first to show conclusively that women's faces gain extra shades of red during ovulation, but it has also found that these variations in facial colour are unlikely to be detected by human eyes.
  • Infection of Ixodes spp. tick cells with different Anaplasma phagocytophilum isolates induces the inhibition of apoptotic cell death

    MedWorm: Zoology
    5 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    In this study we used three different isolates of A. phagocytophilum of human, canine and ovine origin to infect the Ixodes ricinus-derived cell line IRE/CTVM20 and the Ixodes scapularis-derived cell line ISE6 in order to characterize the effect of infection on the level of tick cell apoptosis. Inhibition of apoptosis was observed by flow cytometry as early as 24hours post-infection for both tick cell lines and all three isolates of A. phagocytophilum, suggesting that pathogen infection inhibits apoptotic pathways to facilitate infection independently of the origin of the A. phagocytophilum…
  • Whip Scorpion

    ReptileApartment.com
    John F Taylor
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Invertebrate Interests is authored & photographed by Lillie Nyte of Inverts Unlimited  Whip Scorpion Damon diadema  General Description Subspecies: Damon diadema diadema, Damon diadema robustus Common name(s): Tanzanian giant tailless whip scorpion, Giant tailless whip scorpion, cave spider, whip spider Keeper experience: Beginner to Intermediate Adult size: Over 8 inch leg span Growth rate: Medium […] The article Whip Scorpion appeared…
  • How Can We Engage Our Animals in the Zoo? I.

    ZOOmoments - The Zoo Within
    5 Jul 2015 | 10:21 am
    Animals in the wild need to find food, water, need to check their territory or escape from predators, therefore they spend a lot of their time actively. However, animals in zoos get food and water from the keepers, in most cases they share their enclosure with conspecifics, and as there are no predators to threaten them, they spend much less time actively. Therefore, the staff of zoos need to provide items that encourage animals to be active. Environmental enrichment is essential to preserve the mental health and natural behaviour of captive animals. I collected a few ideas on how we can…
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    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Risk of interbreeding due to climate change lower than expected

    6 Jul 2015 | 8:41 am
    A surprising study of North and South American mammals, birds and amphibians finds that only about 6 percent of closely related species whose ranges do not currently overlap are likely to come into contact by the end of this century.
  • Learning from biology to accelerate discovery

    6 Jul 2015 | 5:53 am
    A new review paper explores the strategies nature employs to achieve different functions and the mechanics at play within those functions. Surveying everything from sea cucumbers and Venus flytraps to human muscles and trees, the review paper broadly explores the strategies that biology employs to create different functions and the mechanics at play within those functions.
  • 'Bee soup' could help understand declines, test remedies

    5 Jul 2015 | 4:46 pm
    It may sound counter-intuitive, but crushing up bees into a 'DNA soup' could help conservationists understand and even reverse their decline, according to scientists. New research shows that collecting wild bees, extracting their DNA, and directly reading the DNA of the resultant 'sop' could finally make large-scale bee monitoring programs feasible. This would allow conservationists to detect where and when bee species are being lost and whether conservation interventions are working.
  • Climate change is turning male dragon lizards into females

    4 Jul 2015 | 5:24 am
    A climate-induced change of male dragon lizards into females occurring in the wild has been confirmed for the first time, according to recent research.
  • Greenhouse gas emissions remain primary threat to polar bears

    3 Jul 2015 | 5:52 am
    Greenhouse gas emissions remain the primary threat to the preservation of polar bear populations worldwide. This conclusion holds true under both a reduced greenhouse gas emission scenario that stabilizes climate warming and another scenario where emissions and warming continue at the current pace, according to updated research models.
 
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    Zoology News

  • Redder? But too subtle for men, ladies

    30 Jun 2015 | 4:24 pm
    New Delhi, June 30: Women's faces acquire extra redness during ovulation, but it's not this subtle change in complexion but their behaviour, clothes or other factors that men seem to find attractive, a study exploring the biology of facial attractiveness has suggested. The study by a team of scientists in the UK is the first to show conclusively that women's faces gain extra shades of red during ovulation, but it has also found that these variations in facial colour are unlikely to be detected by human eyes.
  • Gene link to kidney stone

    28 Jun 2015 | 4:42 pm
    New Delhi, June 28: Biomedical researchers in Calcutta have shown that certain variants of two genes appear to raise the risk of kidney stone disease in Indians, revealing a link established earlier mainly in Caucasian populations. The researchers from three city institutions have found that people who possess certain variants of these two genes face a two-fold to eight-fold greater risk of developing kidney stones than people who lack these variants.
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    MedWorm: Zoology

  • Infection of Ixodes spp. tick cells with different Anaplasma phagocytophilum isolates induces the inhibition of apoptotic cell death

    5 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    In this study we used three different isolates of A. phagocytophilum of human, canine and ovine origin to infect the Ixodes ricinus-derived cell line IRE/CTVM20 and the Ixodes scapularis-derived cell line ISE6 in order to characterize the effect of infection on the level of tick cell apoptosis. Inhibition of apoptosis was observed by flow cytometry as early as 24hours post-infection for both tick cell lines and all three isolates of A. phagocytophilum, suggesting that pathogen infection inhibits apoptotic pathways to facilitate infection independently of the origin of the A. phagocytophilum…
  • A real-time PCR assay for differentiating pathogenic Anaplasma phagocytophilum from an apathogenic, woodrat-adapted genospecies from North America

    5 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 6 July 2015 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Nicole Stephenson , Emir Hodzic , Samantha Mapes , Daniel Rejmanek , Janet Foley Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-transmitted bacterial pathogen of humans and animals comprising strains that cause clinical disease in people, dogs and horses (the pathogenic A. phagocytophilum “genospecies”) and more distantly related strains. A rodent-adapted genospecies named DU1, found primarily in woodrats, is unable to infect horses. We developed a real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay, which targets an 85 base…
  • Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato-infected Ixodes ricinus collected from vegetation near the Arctic Circle

    5 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 6 July 2015 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Dag Hvidsten , Frode Stordal , Malin Lager , Bjørg Rognerud , Bjørn-Erik Kristiansen , Andreas Matussek , Jeremy Gray , Snorre Stuen This is the first study to determine the density of questing Ixodes ricinus in northern Norway. It was performed at two sites in Brønnøy, which has been known for its tick permissive habitats for decades and is one of the northernmost habitats with an abundant I. ricinus population in the world. From April to November 2011, all stages of host-seeking I. ricinus…
  • Effects of testicle insulation on seminal traits in rams: preliminary study

    4 Jul 2015 | 4:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 3 July 2015 Source:Small Ruminant Research Author(s): C.A. Cruz Júnior , C.M. Lucci , V. Peripolli , A.F. Silva , A.M. Menezes , S.R.L. Morais , M.S. Araújo , L.M.C.S. Ribeiro , R.C. Mattos , C. McManus To evaluate the effect of heat stress on sperm characteristics, as well as testicular biometrics and heat radiation, six breeds of rams: two Brazilian locally adapted breeds (Santa Ines and Bergamasca) and four exotic breeds (Dorper, Texel, Ile de France and Hampshire Down) underwent scrotal insulation. The experiment consisted of pre-scrotal insulation…
  • Songbirds Return to North America | @GrrlScientist

    4 Jul 2015 | 7:35 am
    The Migratory Connectivity Project seeks to connect people and cultures throughout the Americas by fostering the public’s love of and appreciation for migratory birdsDid you know the coast of Texas is a critically important place for migratory birds in the U.S. and Canada? This is where most migratory birds that breed in the eastern United States and throughout Canada first make landfall after a long migration across the Gulf of Mexico. This is where they seek food, water and rest before continuing northward on their migratory journeys. But unfortunately, populations of North American…
 
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    ReptileApartment.com

  • Whip Scorpion

    John F Taylor
    3 Jul 2015 | 4:01 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Invertebrate Interests is authored & photographed by Lillie Nyte of Inverts Unlimited  Whip Scorpion Damon diadema  General Description Subspecies: Damon diadema diadema, Damon diadema robustus Common name(s): Tanzanian giant tailless whip scorpion, Giant tailless whip scorpion, cave spider, whip spider Keeper experience: Beginner to Intermediate Adult size: Over 8 inch leg span Growth rate: Medium […] The article Whip Scorpion appeared…
  • Climate change is causing bearded DRAGONS to change gender in Australia | Daily Mail Online

    John F Taylor
    2 Jul 2015 | 4:11 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Climate Causing Parthenogenesis? Really interesting read on what seems to be parthenogenesis as far as I can tell. Climate Sex Change | Bearded Dragons The article Climate change is causing bearded DRAGONS to change gender in Australia | Daily Mail Online appeared first on ReptileApartment.com
  • Kenyan Sand Boa | Are Graboids Real?

    John F Taylor
    24 Jun 2015 | 10:39 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by Todd Cornwell Unique Birthday Party Parties for Kids & Reptile Rescue Tremors of Kenyan Sand Boas My family loves the movie Tremors. We like the goofy fun type movies. When I started out, I was able to purchase a couple of graboids, I mean Kenyan sand boas. I swear they modeled the graboids […] The article Kenyan Sand Boa | Are Graboids Real? appeared first on ReptileApartment.com
  • Leopard Gecko Breeding Part 4 | Aggression

    John F Taylor
    17 Jun 2015 | 3:10 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by Ron Tremper Leopardgecko.com BREEDING LEOPARD GECKOS | Aggression On male aggression and territoriality One of the mantras of leopard gecko keeping is that you cannot keep mature males together or they fight and inflict serious injuries to each other. This is true in captivity and good advice, however other factors play a contributing […] The article Leopard Gecko Breeding Part 4 | Aggression appeared first on…
  • Widow Spiders | Succubi of Herpetoculture

    John F Taylor
    10 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." The Black Widow Spider – Latrodectus spp. Authored by Elle Mactans  Widow Spider Captive Care Latrodectus are a genus of true spiders in the family Theridiidae, most commonly known as the widow spider, or button spiders (other names include hourglass spider, rod spider, cherry spider, black wolf, shoebutton spider, and jockey spider). There currently 32 […] The article Widow Spiders | Succubi of Herpetoculture appeared first on…
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    ZOOmoments - The Zoo Within

  • How Can We Engage Our Animals in the Zoo? I.

    5 Jul 2015 | 10:21 am
    Animals in the wild need to find food, water, need to check their territory or escape from predators, therefore they spend a lot of their time actively. However, animals in zoos get food and water from the keepers, in most cases they share their enclosure with conspecifics, and as there are no predators to threaten them, they spend much less time actively. Therefore, the staff of zoos need to provide items that encourage animals to be active. Environmental enrichment is essential to preserve the mental health and natural behaviour of captive animals. I collected a few ideas on how we can…
  • Five Horrific Zoo Disasters

    23 Jun 2015 | 9:59 am
    Although zoos are usually regarded as modern Noah’s Arks, they can turn into battered dinghies in disasters – like any other achievement of our civilization. Moreover, the inhabitants of zoos are more vulnerable since the systems designed to prevent escape often reduce their chance of survival. The fates of escaping big animals are not too promising either; they are usually hunted down in order to protect people. There can be disasters of either natural or human origin. Could we avoid these tragedies?  Let us see some of the major disasters of zoo history, and we may find an answer…
  • European Zoos for Saving West-African Wildlife - A short overview of the work of WAPCA

    18 Jun 2015 | 12:44 pm
    The Upper Guinean Rainforest, lying in the coastal region of West Africa, is one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in the world. 1800 endemic plants, 49 endemic threatened amphibians, 31 endemic threatened birds and 35 endemic threatened mammal species live in the area. As only 15% of the Upper Guinean Rainforest remains, it is critical to protect this unique wildlife. This is the aim of the West African Primate Conservation Action (WAPCA), which was established by several European zoos, conservation organizations and individuals. WAPCA started work in Ghana in 2001 and in Ivory…
  • TOP 5 European Zoo Websites

    14 Jun 2015 | 6:55 am
    This is a subjective report about my favourite European zoo websites. Before I wrote this article I tried to find any complex international survey on the theme, but unfortunately I could not find any. We don't need any tests to know that PR and marketing activities significantly influence the daily life of zoos. It is unquestionable that a website is an essential device for this.During the test, I used the following criteria: design, usability, content and uniqueness.I also wrote a personal one-sentence remark at the end of each analysis. Read More...
 
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