Zoology

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  • Bats use polarized light to navigate: First mammal known to use polarization patterns in the sky to navigate

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily
    22 Jul 2014 | 8:18 am
    The bats use the way the sun's light is scattered in the atmosphere at sunset to calibrate their internal magnetic compass, which helps them to fly in the right direction, a new study has shown.
  • Mixed genes mix up the migrations of hybrid birds

    Zoology News
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:18 am
    Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research from University of British Columbia zoologists.
  • Piscine reovirus in wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, Canada: 1974–2013

    MedWorm: Zoology
    22 Jul 2014 | 1:11 am
    Abstract Piscine reovirus (PRV) was common among wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, western Canada, from 1987 to 2013. Salmonid tissues tested for PRV by real‐time rRT‐PCR included sections from archived paraffin blocks from 1974 to 2008 (n = 363) and fresh‐frozen hearts from 2013 (n = 916). The earliest PRV‐positive sample was from a wild‐source steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from 1977. By histopathology (n = 404), no fish had lesions diagnostic for heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI). In some groups, lymphohistiocytic endocarditis…
  • The Brazilian Shorthair Cat: Ship To Shore To Home

    WebEcoist
    Steve
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:32 am
    Recognized as a breed in 1998, Brazilian Shorthair cats descend from ship's cats who came to Brazil with Portuguese colonists beginning in the 16th century.The post The Brazilian Shorthair Cat: Ship To Shore To Home appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Corn Snakes: Breeding out the Beauty

    ReptileApartment.com
    James Tintle
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a Passion; it's an Obsession to share our knowledge of herpetoculture with anyone interested." Breeding out the Beauty Courtesy of James Tintle of Tremendous Tricolors Corn Snakes, Pantherophis guttatus, formerly Elaphe guttatus gutattus are the most produced snake in captivity. The ease of care, large clutches and one of the first snakes producing color and pattern mutations are just some of the reasons why. The first amelanistic (also called albino) corn snake was caught by Dr. Benard Betchel in North Carolina in 1953 but…
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    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily

  • Bats use polarized light to navigate: First mammal known to use polarization patterns in the sky to navigate

    22 Jul 2014 | 8:18 am
    The bats use the way the sun's light is scattered in the atmosphere at sunset to calibrate their internal magnetic compass, which helps them to fly in the right direction, a new study has shown.
  • Fly-inspired sound detector: New device based on a fly's freakishly acute hearing for futuristic hearing aids

    22 Jul 2014 | 8:14 am
    The fly can pinpoint the location of a chirping cricket with remarkable accuracy because of its freakishly acute hearing, which relies upon a sophisticated sound processing mechanism that really sets it apart from all other known insects. Researchers have now developed a tiny prototype device that mimics the parasitic fly’s hearing mechanism, which may be useful for a new generation of hypersensitive hearing aids.
  • Mixed genes mix up the migrations of hybrid birds

    22 Jul 2014 | 7:22 am
    Mixed genes appear to drive hybrid birds to select more difficult routes than their parent species, according to new research. "Instead of taking well-trodden paths through fertile areas, these birds choose to scale mountains and cross deserts," says one of the researchers.
  • Mammoth and mastodon behavior was less roam, more stay at home

    21 Jul 2014 | 3:19 pm
    Their scruffy beards weren't ironic, but there are reasons mammoths and mastodons could have been the hipsters of the Ice Age. According to new research, the famously fuzzy relatives of elephants liked living in Greater Cincinnati long before it was trendy -- at the end of the last ice age. A new study shows the ancient proboscideans enjoyed the area so much they likely were year-round residents and not nomadic migrants as previously thought.
  • Real price of steak: Comparing environmental costs of livestock-based foods

    21 Jul 2014 | 12:19 pm
    New research reveals the comparative environmental costs of livestock-based foods. While we are told that eating beef is bad for the environment, do we know its real cost? Are the other animal or animal-derived foods better or worse? New research compared the environmental costs of various foods and came up with some surprisingly clear results. The findings will hopefully not only inform individual dietary choices, authors say, but also those of governmental agencies that set agricultural and marketing policies.
 
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    MedWorm: Zoology

  • Piscine reovirus in wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, Canada: 1974–2013

    22 Jul 2014 | 1:11 am
    Abstract Piscine reovirus (PRV) was common among wild and farmed salmonids in British Columbia, western Canada, from 1987 to 2013. Salmonid tissues tested for PRV by real‐time rRT‐PCR included sections from archived paraffin blocks from 1974 to 2008 (n = 363) and fresh‐frozen hearts from 2013 (n = 916). The earliest PRV‐positive sample was from a wild‐source steelhead trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from 1977. By histopathology (n = 404), no fish had lesions diagnostic for heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI). In some groups, lymphohistiocytic endocarditis…
  • Host tropism of infectious salmon anaemia virus in marine and freshwater fish species

    21 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    In this study, a large number of fish species were investigated for ISAV host potential. For orthomyxoviruses, a specific receptor binding is the first requirement for infection; thus, the fish species were investigated for the presence of the ISAV receptor. The receptor was found to be widely distributed across the fish species. All salmonids expressed the receptor. However, only some of the cod‐like and perch‐like fish did, and all flat fish were negative. In the majority of the positive species, the receptor was found on endothelial cells and/or on red blood cells. The study forms a…
  • Let's Call A Truce…For Now: The Silent Bared‐Teeth Face Expression in Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) During Baseline and Post‐Conflict Conditions

    21 Jul 2014 | 11:10 am
    This study examines the nature of the silent bared‐teeth face (SBTF) in captive mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) both during baseline interactions and following aggressive conflicts. We report that the SBTF is most commonly exchanged between mandrills with high rates of agonism. In addition, the SBTF is the most common post‐conflict signal exchanged, and the mandrills exchanging this signal after fighting also have poor relationships. We conclude that, although one must be careful in generalizing from studies of captive populations, the mandrill SBTF observed in this study is most accurately…
  • Shyness–Boldness, but not Exploration, Predicts Glucocorticoid Stress Response in Richardson's Ground Squirrels (Urocitellus richardsonii)

    20 Jul 2014 | 10:21 pm
    Abstract The relationship between stress and personality has often been studied using captive animals in a laboratory context, yet less often in wild populations. Wild populations, however, may reveal aspects of the personality–stress relationship that laboratory‐based studies cannot. Here, we assessed the personality and stress hormone response of adult females within a free‐living population of Richardson's ground squirrels (Urocitellus richardsonii). Personality was assessed by quantifying individual responses to a novel object, and physiological stress was measured from faecal…
  • Was this the last wild wolf of Britain?

    20 Jul 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Adam Weymouth picks up the trail of the wolf folklore suggests was the last to roam wildly in Great Britain before being shot in the Scottish Highlands in 1680 Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
 
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    WebEcoist

  • The Brazilian Shorthair Cat: Ship To Shore To Home

    Steve
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:32 am
    Recognized as a breed in 1998, Brazilian Shorthair cats descend from ship's cats who came to Brazil with Portuguese colonists beginning in the 16th century.The post The Brazilian Shorthair Cat: Ship To Shore To Home appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • 10 Most Creative Buildings Made from Salvaged Wood

    Steph
    21 Jul 2014 | 12:37 pm
    Think that broken piece of furniture, busted boat or scrap siding from a renovation is trash? You’ll think again after seeing these 10 marvels of creative and sustainable thinking. From a cottage made of discarded Tudor furniture to the world’s tallest treehouse made of salvaged wood of all sorts, these structures inspire us to take […]The post 10 Most Creative Buildings Made from Salvaged Wood appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Beautiful Modern Cabin is Made of Leftover Building Materials

    Steph
    18 Jul 2014 | 12:01 pm
    With its clean lines and wall of windows facing views of the Sonoma Coast in California, the Breuer Cabin has a modern yet rustic feel. But the coolest thing about this compact residence isn’t its looks or location – it’s the fact that the structure is made almost entirely from leftover building materials. San Francisco-based […]The post Beautiful Modern Cabin is Made of Leftover Building Materials appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Mistaken for an Oil Spill, this Shadow in the Sea Will Surprise You

    Steph
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:07 am
    Beachgoers in La Jolla, California took in a disturbing sight as they gazed out onto the ocean on July 8th, 2014. A dark, undulating shadow was making its way toward the sand, creating massive blotches in the otherwise crystalline blue-green waters. They feared it was an oil spill, which would take a harsh toll on […]The post Mistaken for an Oil Spill, this Shadow in the Sea Will Surprise You appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • A Tale Of Zoo Kitties: Stray Cat & Lynx Are Now BFFFs

    Steve
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:58 am
    A stray calico cat found both a home and a Best Feline Friend Forever after sneaking into a European Lynx's enclosure at the St. Petersburg Leningradsky Zoo.The post A Tale Of Zoo Kitties: Stray Cat & Lynx Are Now BFFFs appeared first on WebEcoist.
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    ReptileApartment.com

  • Corn Snakes: Breeding out the Beauty

    James Tintle
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a Passion; it's an Obsession to share our knowledge of herpetoculture with anyone interested." Breeding out the Beauty Courtesy of James Tintle of Tremendous Tricolors Corn Snakes, Pantherophis guttatus, formerly Elaphe guttatus gutattus are the most produced snake in captivity. The ease of care, large clutches and one of the first snakes producing color and pattern mutations are just some of the reasons why. The first amelanistic (also called albino) corn snake was caught by Dr. Benard Betchel in North Carolina in 1953 but…
  • Of Gopher Tortoises & Torture

    Chris M. Law
    18 Jul 2014 | 3:53 pm
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a Passion; it's an Obsession to share our knowledge of herpetoculture with anyone interested." On July 17th, two teenage girls released a couple of videos on YouTube of them actively trying to set a state and federally protected Gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) on fire using rubbing alcohol. When that didn’t provide them the results they desired, they resorted to throwing it out in the middle of the street and then later, stomping it to death. Cruel treatment of reptiles is far from being unheard of. Most commonly, snakes are…
  • Wacky Grey-banded Kingsnakes

    John F Taylor
    16 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a Passion; it's an Obsession to share our knowledge of herpetoculture with anyone interested." A week ago now James released publicly that he’d successfully hatched the Coffey Line of Aberrant patterned Grey-banded Kingsnakes (Lampropeltis alterna). A common snake species but a more rare genetic morph. Reading James’ new piece in HerpHouseMag shed some light on the fact, these have been around for a while; and aren’t easily produced. Not only is this snake a stunning grey blue but they also have a chocolate to burnt reddish-orange…
 
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