Zoology

  • Most Topular Stories

  • How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily
    21 Nov 2014 | 4:21 pm
    Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds. Now, the most detailed, three-dimensional aerodynamic simulation of hummingbird flight conducted to date has definitively demonstrated that the hummingbird achieves its nimble aerobatic abilities through a unique set of aerodynamic forces that are more closely aligned to those found in flying insects than to other birds.
  • Sue Carter Named Director of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University

    Zoology News
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:34 pm
    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Indiana University has appointed Sue Carter, a pioneering leader in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, as director of The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, effective Nov. 1. The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington was founded in 1947 by its namesake, zoologist Alfred Kinsey.
  • Evidence of Reciprocal Allonursing in Reindeer, Rangifer tarandus

    MedWorm: Zoology
    21 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Abstract The nursing of non‐offspring is referred to as allonursing. Reciprocity is a hypothesized cause of allonursing, but previous studies have not strongly supported or found no evidence in support for this hypothesis. Biological market theory was applied to 25 reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) does and their calves to investigate allonursing reciprocity across bouts and within dyads and assess the diversity of allonursing partners. We also investigated whether variation in allonursing would be associated to relatedness within dyads. We recorded both the occurrence and the duration of 1027…
  • Jet Set: Reclaimed Aircraft Renovated into 2-Bedroom Apartment

    WebEcoist
    Steph
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Sleeping on an airplane isn’t typically an attractive prospect, conjuring visions of crammed limbs and the potential for a stranger to end up drooling on your shoulder. But one bright blue jet in Amsterdam offers far more comfortable accommodations – in the form of a two-bedroom apartment that you can rent on AirBNB. KLM renovated […] The post Jet Set: Reclaimed Aircraft Renovated into 2-Bedroom Apartment appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Metabolic Bone Disease in Reptiles | Treatment

    ReptileApartment.com
    John F Taylor
    20 Nov 2014 | 7:59 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by: Christina Miller CAHT/RVT, RLAT, BSc Treatment of metabolic bone diseases How an afflicted animal will be treated depends entirely on the severity of the disease and any complicating factors. At this point, it is important to reiterate the importance of the veterinary team in diagnosing the disease and any concurrent problems. Pet owners attempting to treat metabolic bone diseases at home, in my experience, nearly always results in a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Zoology News -- ScienceDaily

  • How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

    21 Nov 2014 | 4:21 pm
    Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds. Now, the most detailed, three-dimensional aerodynamic simulation of hummingbird flight conducted to date has definitively demonstrated that the hummingbird achieves its nimble aerobatic abilities through a unique set of aerodynamic forces that are more closely aligned to those found in flying insects than to other birds.
  • Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs

    21 Nov 2014 | 7:25 am
    Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
  • Dizzying heights: Prehistoric farming on the 'roof of the world'

    20 Nov 2014 | 11:17 am
    Archaeological findings pose questions about genetic resistance in humans to altitude sickness and genetic response in crop plants to flowering times and ultraviolet radiation tolerance. Archaeological discoveries from the 'roof of the world' on the Tibetan Plateau indicate that from 3,600 years ago, crop growing and the raising of livestock was taking place year-round at hitherto unprecedented altitudes.
  • Biomarker could provide early warning of kidney disease in cats

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:34 am
    A new biomarker called 'SDMA' has been developed that can provide earlier identification of chronic kidney disease in cats, which is one of the leading causes of their death. When a test is commercialized, it could help pet owners add months or years to the life of their cat.
  • Darwin 2.0: New theory on speciation, diversity

    20 Nov 2014 | 9:32 am
    It has long been thought that dramatic changes in a landscape like the formation of the Andes Mountain range or the Amazon River is the main driver that initiates species to diverge. However, a recent study shows that speciation occurred much later than these dramatic geographical changes. Researchers have found that time and a species' ability to move play greater parts in the process of speciation.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Zoology News

  • Sue Carter Named Director of the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:34 pm
    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Indiana University has appointed Sue Carter, a pioneering leader in the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, as director of The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction, effective Nov. 1. The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington was founded in 1947 by its namesake, zoologist Alfred Kinsey.
  • Trinity Zoologists Champion a Clever Conservation Solution: 'Vulture Restaurants'

    22 Oct 2014 | 11:44 am
    Zoologists from the School of Natural Sciences at Trinity College Dublin are proposing an ingenious idea to help conserve populations of African white-backed vultures. The iconic birds, which play a critical role in sustaining healthy ecosystems, may need to dine for free in human-staffed 'vulture restaurants' if they are to survive spells of food scarcity in Swaziland and neighbouring countries.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    MedWorm: Zoology

  • Evidence of Reciprocal Allonursing in Reindeer, Rangifer tarandus

    21 Nov 2014 | 11:15 am
    Abstract The nursing of non‐offspring is referred to as allonursing. Reciprocity is a hypothesized cause of allonursing, but previous studies have not strongly supported or found no evidence in support for this hypothesis. Biological market theory was applied to 25 reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) does and their calves to investigate allonursing reciprocity across bouts and within dyads and assess the diversity of allonursing partners. We also investigated whether variation in allonursing would be associated to relatedness within dyads. We recorded both the occurrence and the duration of 1027…
  • From the archive, 20 November 1970: The diary of a persistent schoolboy zoologist

    21 Nov 2014 | 7:45 am
    ‘25 Oct. Bought a French grass snake for 15s. The snake has not eaten yet. I offered it some flies but it refused to eat them’The “Schools Bulletin” of the West Riding Education Committee, published yesterday, told the story of the persistent schoolboy zoologist by quoting extracts from the diary he kept during rural studies leading to the Certificate of Secondary Education examination:1968 Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
  • Atlantic surgeonfishes bear only minor microstructural changes in highly derived karyotypes

    20 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 20 November 2014 Source:Zoologischer Anzeiger - A Journal of Comparative Zoology Author(s): Maria Aparecida Fernandes , Paulo Roberto Antunes de Mello Affonso , Marcelo de Bello Cioffi , Luiz Antonio Carlos Bertollo , Gideão Wagner Werneck Félix Costa , Wagner Franco Molina Acanthurus is a representative and widespread genus of marine fish that plays a key role in ecological dynamics of coral reefs. Three species are common along coastal reefs of Western Atlantic: A. coeruleus, A. bahianus and A. chirurgus. The cytogenetic patterns of these species…
  • Taxonomic analysis of Lachnus pallipes/longirostris–roboris complex (Hemiptera, Aphididae, Lachninae), with the redescription of sexual morphs and new synonymy

    20 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 20 November 2014 Source:Zoologischer Anzeiger - A Journal of Comparative Zoology Author(s): Ewa Mroz , Joanna Trela , Łukasz Depa • Conversion The aphid genus Lachnus contains some species of uncertain taxonomic status, described either as separate species despite having similar morphology, or as host plant races. The separation of L. pallipes and L. longirostris exemplifies this uncertainty. Following a detailed morphological analysis and the application of molecular markers COXI and COXII, their taxonomic position is clarified. The morphology of L.
  • Ultrastructure and tube formation in Ceriantharia (Cnidaria, Anthozoa)

    20 Nov 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Publication date: Available online 20 November 2014 Source:Zoologischer Anzeiger - A Journal of Comparative Zoology Author(s): Sérgio N. Stampar , Julia S. Beneti , Fabian H. Acuña , André C. Morandini Cnidomes are an important feature that diagnoses groups of Cnidaria. Our paper describes how these structures are used in the formation of the tubes of tube anemones, Ceriantharia. The structure of the tube was observed using SEM and the organization of the tubules are described for members of the three families of Ceriantharia. Additionally, the mode of production of the tube from animals…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    WebEcoist

  • Jet Set: Reclaimed Aircraft Renovated into 2-Bedroom Apartment

    Steph
    21 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    Sleeping on an airplane isn’t typically an attractive prospect, conjuring visions of crammed limbs and the potential for a stranger to end up drooling on your shoulder. But one bright blue jet in Amsterdam offers far more comfortable accommodations – in the form of a two-bedroom apartment that you can rent on AirBNB. KLM renovated […] The post Jet Set: Reclaimed Aircraft Renovated into 2-Bedroom Apartment appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Electronics Plant Ditches Disks, Pitches Lettuce

    Steve
    18 Nov 2014 | 10:00 am
    Be-leaf it or not, a mothballed Japanese electronics plant reinvented itself as a hydroponic vegetable farm while putting a healthy spin on greenwashing. The post Electronics Plant Ditches Disks, Pitches Lettuce appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Trashy Hotel: 22 Temporary Rooms Made of Junk

    Steph
    14 Nov 2014 | 12:13 pm
    If someone told you a hotel is trashy, that would most likely turn you off with visions of unsanitary conditions and scratchy bedsheets. But in this case, ‘trashy’ is a literal descriptor, indicating that the 22 rooms spread across the city of Mannheim are actually made of garbage – and that’s a surprisingly good thing, […] The post Trashy Hotel: 22 Temporary Rooms Made of Junk appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Cold Comfort: Polar Bear Swims Do A Body Good

    Steve
    11 Nov 2014 | 9:00 am
    Polar Bear Swims are all in a day's work for polar bears but how to explain the popularity of these extreme winter swims with (mostly) hairless humans? The post Cold Comfort: Polar Bear Swims Do A Body Good appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • Creative Bus Conversion: Public Transit Turned Russian Night Club

    Steph
    8 Nov 2014 | 4:37 pm
    Now here’s a fun and creative way to re-use a junky old decommissioned city bus: turn it into a rolling night club. A group of Russian entrepreneurs purchased an Ikarus 280 public transportation vehicle, ripped out the interior until there was nothing but a bare frame, and then used it as a shell to house […] The post Creative Bus Conversion: Public Transit Turned Russian Night Club appeared first on WebEcoist.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ReptileApartment.com

  • Metabolic Bone Disease in Reptiles | Treatment

    John F Taylor
    20 Nov 2014 | 7:59 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by: Christina Miller CAHT/RVT, RLAT, BSc Treatment of metabolic bone diseases How an afflicted animal will be treated depends entirely on the severity of the disease and any complicating factors. At this point, it is important to reiterate the importance of the veterinary team in diagnosing the disease and any concurrent problems. Pet owners attempting to treat metabolic bone diseases at home, in my experience, nearly always results in a…
  • Treating Reptile Aggression | Lizards

    John F Taylor
    17 Nov 2014 | 5:28 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." Authored by: Todd Cornwell | Unique Birthday Parties for Kids & Reptile Rescue Treating Aggressive Lizards Apparently the article on Treating Aggression in Snakes was very popular. So the publisher asked me if I would do the same thing for lizards. How do you treat aggression in lizards? And dang it, I’m stumped. As a rescue, I deal with all kinds of reptiles, snakes, lizards, frogs, turtles (and yes, I know not all of those were…
  • Protest the G-20 Summit, just leave your reptiles at home!

    John F Taylor
    15 Nov 2014 | 5:33 am
    ReptileApartment.com - "It's Not a desire; it's an obsession to share our knowledge with people interested in herpetoculture." According to the The Washington Post, Australia Zoo is allowed inside summit but ‘protesters’ cannot bring their own reptiles to the event. This speaks volumes to what we’ve been saying and just covered in Snakes Don’t Make Good Wardrobe.  It’s great that you enjoy reptiles, we do to. With that personal responsibility and  accountability go a long way in the struggles we face daily in our goals to keep reptiles at…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ZOOmoments - The Zoo Within

  • Pere David’s Deer Free Again in China

    20 Nov 2014 | 10:15 am
    Modern zoos are often seen as present-day Noah’s Arks, due to the fact that their resources are mainly dedicated to saving endangered species from extinction. Several classic examples are known from the past where species owe their existence to zoos and wildlife parks. One of the most famous of such animals is the Pere David’s deer (Elaphurus davidianus), also known as milu. The species has been extinct for more than a hundred years in its original habitat, but thanks to captive breeding, Pere David’s deer can now be found in China again. Read More...
  • Herpestids in European Zoological Gardens

    13 Nov 2014 | 11:05 am
    Taxonomic Overview Currently there are 34 species of mongooses described in the family Herpestidae, although further taxonomic research may change this number in the future. Twenty-five members of the taxon live in Africa and nine in Asia. According to the current subdivision of Herpestidae ― using not only morphology, but also behavioural ecology and molecular markers ― two subfamilies are supported within the taxon. The subfamily Herpestinae involves 23, mostly large and solitary mongoose species (genus Atilax, Bdeogale, Cynictis, Galerella, Herpestes, Ichneumia, Paracynictis,…
  • Which is the Best Zoo of the World?

    6 Nov 2014 | 7:46 am
    For many, merely hearing this question makes their hair stand on end, however, finding the answer means a lot for many others who even enjoy the process! Is it possible at all to find a comprehensive and objective answer to the question in the title? This is one of the most controversial topics nowadays that often leads to it being shunned discreetly. The avoiding of the topic is not unintentional. Is it important at all to find the answer? It surely is, for the winners! So, let us devote some of our time to examine the matter! Read More...
  • A Real Success Story – How the Hungarian Meadow Viper has been Saved from Extinction

    1 Nov 2014 | 7:25 am
    While some conservationists oppose or at least debate the raison d'être of ex situ conservation, there are positive examples which show the effectiveness of cooperation with in situ methods. The great success of the Hungarian Meadow Viper LIFE-project is a good example for this. In addition, this conservation project works well with zoos, which makes it a good example of this kind of cooperation. When the project started in 2004, there were only about 500 Hungarian meadow vipers (Vipera ursinii rakosiensis) in the wild, and the species was considered almost extinct. Their number - including…
Log in